Telemedicine finally had its big moment. But is it here to stay?

- [Narrator] Amidst the Coronavirus pandemic, people feeling mild symptoms of the virus can face a difficult choice. Either leave their home to see a doctor, and risk exposing themselves and others, or stay home and forgo medical advice.

- What's happening is that people are worried, they're frightened, people don't know really what to do, where to go, whether or not they should get a test for the virus. - That's where Telemedicine comes in.

- Our doctors will initially start off with going through an initial assessment. You have a fever? What's your temperature been? Do you have a cough? Shortness of breath? - [Narrator] CareClix is a telemedicine company, with more than 20 million users across the U.

S. And it says it's seen a 50% uptake in users in March. - From the user's perspective, for the patient and/or the doctor, they're not doing anything different than they would if you came in solely face to face.

The only thing different is now we have a monitor between us essentially. - [Narrator] Along with other providers, who license its technology, CareClix is offering its COVID-19 evaluations for free. - If you fit the criteria, we make a judgment call, you're really sick? Yes, go to the hospital, go to the emergency room, have them see you.

But people who are not that acute, that we feel can be managed remotely, we're gonna manage remotely and assess them and guide them through the process. - [Narrator] According to the CDC, most people with COVID-19 have mild symptoms, and are able to recover at home without medical care.

More virtual check-ups should mean fewer patients crowding into hospitals, where resources are already stretched incredibly thin. - I think in some ways, it is a breakout moment, because I think that we're now saying, "hey, here's your real value proposition," for what this sort of technology allows healthcare to do.

- [Narrator] Not all telemedicine companies are approaching COVID-19 the same way. Based in Minnesota, Zipnosis has built a web-based questionnaire for people who think they might have the virus. - So what we said was let's develop a way where a patient or provider don't have to interact real-time.

Let's take really smart computers systems and have them do the bulk of the work. As you're going through the questions, we're constantly calculating on the back-end, are you still appropriate for virtual care? And so in some cases, the software will say, you're too sick, what you should do is go into a clinic setting.

- [Narrator] Although a computer is making these initial judgements any final diagnosis is made by a real clinician who reviews each patient's answers. - We take all of that data and information and we package it up for the clinician to make a diagnosis in an average of 89 seconds with higher adherence to guidelines than in-person care.

- [Narrator] Zipnosis claims its system can dramatically increase efficiency. - It takes a lot of the burden off of the clinician first of all, but second it makes it really easy for use as a patient.

- [Narrator] Currently 51 healthcare providers use the company's technology. 21 of them offer this COVID-19 virtual screening for free. In March, Zipnosis saw a 3600% increase in virtual visits on its platform in just 11 days.

- It's been a desire of the industry for a long time where we stopped talking about telemedicine or virtual care and it becomes healthcare and I think this will be the catalyst for that. - [Narrator] But the sudden growth has proved challenging.

Across telemedicine platforms, virtual wait times have ranged anywhere from a few minutes to a couple of hours. As a result, healthcare companies have had to rapidly hire new clinicians to meet the growing demand.

Zipnosis for one says that more than 1400 new clinicians were trained on its platform in March. - Telemedicine has been around for over 25 years, the adoption and utilization of telehealth by both consumers as well as clinicians was pretty anemic.

it was low and what has happened in the last couple of weeks is just an incredible surge of interest in terms of telehealth services. - [Narrator] Still, some patients are hesitant to use telemedicine.

- There's a concern that somehow it's impersonal and in point of fact you all know that you've interacted with a physician or a clinician and have had them provide a lot of services to you without ever laying hands on you.

So part of it is overcoming this myth that somehow its second-class medicine. amidst the corona virus pandemic people feeling mild symptoms of the virus can face a difficult choice either leave their home to see a doctor and risk exposing themselves and others or stay home and forego medical advice what's happening is that people are worried they're frightened people don't know really what to do where to go where they're not they should get a test with the search for the virus that's where telemedicine comes in our doctors will if you start with going to an initial assessment you have a fever or what's your temperature pin you have a cough shortness of breath care clicks is a telemedicine company with more than 20 million users across the u.

s. and it says it's seen a 50 percent uptick in users in March from the users perspective or the patient and/or the doctor they're not doing anything different than they would if you came in solely face-to-face the only thing difference is now we have a monitors between us essentially along with other providers who licensed its technology care clicks is offering its kovat 19 evaluations for free if you fit the criteria we need to make a judgment call you're really sick yes go to the hospital or the emergency room have them see you but people who are not that acute that we feel like we managed remotely we're good manager remotely in an assessment cognitive process according to the CDC most people with kovat 19 have mild symptoms and are able to recover at home without medical care more virtual checkups should mean fewer patients crowding into hospitals where resources are already stretched incredibly thin I think in some ways it is a breakout moment because I think that we're now saying hey here's a real value proposition for what the store technology allows healthcare to do not all telemedicine companies are approaching kovat 19 the same way based in Minnesota zip gnosis has built a web-based questionnaire for people who think they might have the virus so what we said was let's develop a way where a patient or provider don't have to interact in real-time let's take really smart computer systems and have them do the bulk of the work as you're going through the questions we're constantly calculating on the back end or you still appropriate for virtual care and so in some cases the the software will say you're too sick what you should do is go into a clinic setting although a computer is making these initial judgments any final diagnosis is made by a real clinician who reviews each patient's answers take all of that data and information and we package it up for the clinician to make a diagnosis in an average of 89 seconds with higher adherence to guidelines than in-person care hypnosis claims its system can dramatically increase efficiency it takes a lot of the burden off of the clinician first of all but second it makes it really easy for you as a patient currently 51 healthcare providers use the company's technology 21 of them offer this co vid 19 virtual screening for free in March hypnosis saw a 3,600 percent increase in virtual visits on its platform in just 11 days it's been a desire of the industry for a long time where we stop talking about telemedicine or virtual appearances becomes healthcare and I think this will be the catalyst for that but the sudden growth has proved challenging across telemedicine platforms of virtual wait times have ranged anywhere from a few minutes to a couple of hours as a result healthcare companies have had to rapidly hire new clinicians to meet the growing demand hypnosis for one says that more than 1,400 new clinicians were trained on its platform in March that has been around for over 25 years the adoption utilization of telehealth by both consumers as well as clinicians was pretty anemic who is Lo and what has happened in the last couple weeks is just an incredible surge of interest in terms of telehealth services still some patients are hesitant to use telemedicine there's a concern that somehow its impersonal and in point of fact you all know that you've interacted with a physician or clinician and have had them provide a lot of services to you without ever laying hands on you so part of it is overcoming this myth that somehow its second class medicine [Music]


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